Radio-frequency identification

Radio-frequency identification (RFID)

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the wireless non-contact use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data, for the purposes of automatically identifying and tracking tags attached to objects. The tags contain electronically stored information. Some tags are powered by and read at short ranges (a few meters) via magnetic fields (electromagnetic induction). Others use a local power source such as a battery, or else have no battery but collect energy from the interrogating EM field, and then act as a passive transponder to emit microwaves or UHF radio waves.

A radio-frequency identification system uses tags, or labels attached to the objects to be identified. Two-way radio transmitter-receivers called interrogators or readers send a signal to the tag and read its response.

RFID tags can be either passive, active or battery-assisted passive. An active tag has an on-board battery and periodically transmits its ID signal. A battery-assisted passive (BAP) has a small battery on board and is activated when in the presence of an RFID reader. A passive tag is cheaper and smaller because it has no battery. However, to start operation of passive tags, they must be illuminated with a power level roughly three magnitudes stronger than for signal transmission.

RFID tags contain at least two parts: an integrated circuit for storing and processing information, modulating and demodulating a radio-frequency (RF) signal, collecting DC power from the incident reader signal, and other specialized functions; and an antenna for receiving and transmitting the signal. The tag information is stored in a non-volatile memory. The RFID tag includes either a chip-wired logic or a programmed or programmable data processor for processing the transmission and sensor data, respectively.

An RFID reader transmits an encoded radio signal to interrogate the tag. The RFID tag receives the message and then responds with its identification and other information. This may be only a unique tag serial number, or may be product-related information such as a stock number, lot or batch number, production date, or other specific information.

Signaling between the reader and the tag is done in several different incompatible ways, depending on the frequency band used by the tag. Tags operating on LF and HF bands are, in terms of radio wavelength, very close to the reader antenna because they are only a small percentage of a wavelength away. In this near field region, the tag is closely coupled electrically with the transmitter in the reader. The tag can modulate the field produced by the reader by changing the electrical loading the tag represents. By switching between lower and higher relative loads, the tag produces a change that the reader can detect. At UHF and higher frequencies, the tag is more than one radio wavelength away from the reader, requiring a different approach.
The tag can backscatter a signal. Active tags may contain functionally separated transmitters and receivers, and the tag need not respond on a frequency related to the reader's interrogation signal.

An Electronic Product Code (EPC) is one common type of data stored in a tag. When written into the tag by an RFID printer, the tag contains a 96-bit string of data. The first eight bits are a header which identifies the version of the protocol. The next 28 bits identify the organization that manages the data for this tag; the organization number is assigned by the EPCGlobal consortium. The next 24 bits are an object class, identifying the kind of product; the last 36 bits are a unique serial number for a particular tag. These last two fields are set by the organization that issued the tag.

Uses: The RFID tag can be affixed to an object and used to track and manage inventory, assets, people, etc. For example, it can be affixed to cars, computer equipment, books, mobile phones, etc. RFID offers advantages over manual systems or use of bar codes. The tag can be read if passed near a reader, even if it is covered by the object or not visible. The tag can be read inside a case, carton, box or other container, and unlike barcodes, RFID tags can be read hundreds at a time. Bar codes can only be read one at a time using current devices Advantage: Whether it is tracking inventory in a warehouse or maintaining a fleet of vehicles, there is a clear need for a fully automated data capture and analysis system that will help you keep track of your valuable assets and equipment.

RFID technologies provide unique solutions to difficult logistical tracking of inventory or equipment particularly in applications where optically based systems fail and when read/write capabilities are required. This technology is stable, and evolving, with open architectures becoming increasingly available.
 

Key Benefits:

  • Long read range
  • Re-writeable
  • Multiple tag read/write
  • High inventory speeds
  • Variety of form factors
  • Portable database
  • Line of sight or alignment is not necessary
  • Real-time tracking of people, items, and equipment
  • The tag can with stand harsh environments
  • making it available for various applications

A Few of the RFID applications:

  • Supply Chains, including Wholesale and Retail Inventory and Materials Management
  • Access Control
  • Libraries
  • Livestock and Wildlife Tagging
  • Pharmaceutical Anti-drug Counterfeiting
  • Automobile Keyless Start Systems Solar
  • Cashless Management Hospitality Management.

About Us

Stech Id Solutions Private Limited is a premium manufacturer of high-quality passive RFID tags. The purpose of our existence is to enable customers to maximize value through the implementation of an efficient and economical RFID Systems. An ISO 9001:2008 company,

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